header image Professor Hakim Dilshad Hussain Tabssum (Gold Medalist) Ex-member: American Infertility Association (USA)
 
 

Ectopic-Tubal Pregnancy

Ectopic-pregnancy Ectopic pregnancy is a common, life-threatening condition that affects 1 in 80 pregnancies. Put very simply, it means “an out-of-place pregnancy”. It occurs when a woman’s ovum (egg), that has been fertilised, implants (gets stuck somewhere) instead of moving successfully down her fallopian tube into the womb to develop there. The most common place for an ectopic pregnancy is the fallopian tube but there are many other sites where an ectopic pregnancy can be located. It is, sadly, not possible to move an ectopic pregnancy.  

1.What is an ectopic pregnancy?
2.Reasons for an ectopic pregnancy
3.Symptoms of ectopic pregnancy
4.Diagnosing an ectopic pregnancy
5.Treating an ectopic pregnancy
6.Your body after an ectopic pregnancy
7.Your emotions after an ectopic pregnancy
8.Trying to conceive after an ectopic pregnancy
9.Dads and ectopic pregnancy
10. Herbal treatment before and after anectopic pregnancy?

 1.What is an ectopic pregnancy?  

Ectopic pregnancy is a common, life-threatening condition that affects 1 in 80 pregnancies. Put very simply, it means “an out-of-place pregnancy”. It occurs when a woman’s ovum (egg), that has been fertilised, implants (gets stuck somewhere) instead of moving successfully down her fallopian tube into the womb to develop there. The most common place for an ectopic pregnancy is the fallopian tube but there are many other sites where an ectopic pregnancy can be located. It is, sadly, not possible to move an ectopic pregnancy.
Each month, before a woman has her period, one of her ovaries produces an ovum that is drawn into one of the fine finger-like tubes called fimbriae, passes through it, and is deposited into the end of the fallopian tube. The ovum then makes its way towards the womb. During the course of this journey it may encounter a man’s sperm, in which case it becomes fertile.
If it is fertilised, the ovum implants itself into the special lining of the womb (renewed each month) called the endometrium and becomes a baby. If it is not fertilised, then both ovum and lining are discharged in the menstrual flow (period), a fresh lining is prepared and a new ovum begins to ripen within the ovary.
In the case of an ectopic pregnancy, the fimbriae can fail to catch the ovum so the ovum becomes fertilised outside the reproductive system or, more commonly, the fertilised ovum becomes caught while progressing down the fallopian tube. In this case, the baby continues to grow inside the tube where it can cause the tube to burst or otherwise severely damage it. In either case, a serious medical condition is likely to develop, requiring immediate attention.
The diagram shows where ectopic pregnancies are most likely to occur:
Ectopic pregnancy diagram
  • 80% are Ampullary (in the upper part of the fallopian tube)
  • 12% are Isthmic (in the lower part of the fallopian tube)
  • 5% are Fimbrial (caught in the fimbriae)
  • 2% are Interstitial/Cornual (inside the uterus but outside the cavity)
  • 1.4% are Abdominal (in the abdomen)
  • 0.2% are Ovarian (in or on the ovary)
  • 0.2% are Cervical (on the Cervix)

2.Reasons for an ectopic pregnancy

Any sexually active woman of childbearing age is at risk of an ectopic pregnancy and often the reason for the ectopic pregnancy will never be determined. However, ectopic pregnancies are more likely if you have had:
 
 

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